Lesley UniversityBirmingham (Hoover), AL
Teaching and Learning With Multimedia, Spring - 2006

Weekend 1: January 6,7,8, 2006
Weekend 2:
February 3,4,5, 2006

 

ECOMP 5016
Technology in Education Program
Instructor: Barry Haines
Email: Barry@Haines.net
Or Barry Haines
4
Hillcrest Place
Mendham, NJ  07945
  (973) 543-2577

http://www.barry.haines.net/
Course Web Site:
http://barry.haines.net/Lesley.html
Site Coordinator & Lab Coordinator
Cameron McKinley
H: 205-402-0509
W: 205-869-3034

cmckinley@hoover.k12.al.us

SYLLABUS

 

ECOMP 6016 TEACHING AND LEARNING WITH DIGITAL MEDIA [3 Credits]

This is a combination of the two related courses formerly known as:

ECOMP 5016 Teaching and Learning with Multimedia &ECOMP 6010 Video as Educational Technology

 

OVERVIEW

 

This course will help educators to harness the power of digital media for teaching and learning. They will learn to use that power to transform traditional teacher-centered classrooms into student-focused learning environments where students use digital media for the acquisition, analysis, construction, and presentation of knowledge. Hands on experiences will also help them develop proficiency with the tools and skills needed for authoring and publishing digital media in a variety of formats.  Through research, discussion, and practice, participants will discover how to integrate existing technologies across the curriculum.

 

GOAL AND OBJECTIVES*

 

Overall Goal

 

Learn to create rich learning environments in which students use digital media for the acquisition, analysis, construction, and presentation of knowledge.

 

Theory & Practice Objectives

 

● Gain functional knowledge about educational media resources and associated teacher support materials. (ISTE II-C)

 

● Know rationales and methods for using constructivist, inquiry and project based learning activities. (ISTE II-A, B, III-B)

 

● Devise digital media experiences for the classroom that address both content and technology standards. (ISTE III-A)

 

● Know the definition, rationales and strategies for developing media literacy in the classroom.  (ISTE VI-D)

 

● Know and use a variety of planning and design techniques and principles for digital media projects.  (ISTE II-A)

 

● Incorporate learning theory and research into the design and planning of digital media activities. (ISTE II-B, V-B)

 

● Know rationales and approaches for alternative assessment strategies for digital media projects. (ISTE IV, IV-C, V-B)

 

Tools & Skills Objectives

 

● Develop proficiency at tools and skills for authoring and publishing digital media. (ISTE I-A, B, II-C, V-A, C, D, VI-A)

 

● Use web authoring tools for constructing rich digital learning environments. (ISTE I-A, B)

 

Examine and appreciate issues of intellectual property and copyright as it relates to using digital media. (ISTE VI-A)

 

● Find, repurpose and generate original text, graphics, audio and video. (ISTE I-A, II-C, V-A, C, D)

 

● Construct complex, powerful video segments incorporating text, visual, audio and video files. (ISTE I-A & B, II-C)

 

● Master strategies for publishing digital media using mass storage devices and the web. (ISTE I-A)
READINGS

 

 

 

 

 

Required Text

 

Simkins, M., Cole, K., Tavalin, F. & Means, B. (2002).  Increasing Student Learning Through Multimedia Projects. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/2002simkins/2002simkinstoc.html

 

 

Recommended Texts

 

 

 

Lamb A.  (1999). Building treehouses for learning

(2nd Ed.). Emporia, Kansas: Vision to Action.

 

 

 

Green, T. D. & Brown, A. (2002). Multimedia projects in the classroom: A guide to development and evaluation.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.           

 

 

Theodosakis, N. (2001). The director in the classroom: How filmmaking inspires learning. San Diego, CA: Tech4Learning.

                                                     

Brunner, C. & Talley, W. (1999). The new media literacy handbook:  An educator's guide to bringing new media into the classroom.  New York, NY: Doubleday.

 

 


Recommended Websites

 

 

 

Lamb, A. (2005). Multimedia Seeds

(Based on Building Treehouses for Learning)

http://eduscapes.com/seeds/

 

 

 

 

i, cringely, Robert X. Cringely

http://www.pbs.org/cringely/

 

Consider This Articles (David Thornburg)

http://teacherline.pbs.org/teacherline/resources/archive_thornburg.cfm

 

The Encyclopedia of Educational Technology

http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/

 

From Now On, The Educational Technology Journal

http://www.fno.org/

 

The George Lucas Educational Foundation

http://www.glef.org

 

Information Today’s Multimedia & Internet @ Schools!

http://www.infotoday.com/MMSchools/

 

Journal of Technology Education

http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/

 

Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educator’s

http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/

 

Multimedia Schools

http://www.infotoday.com/mmschools/default.htm

 

New Horizons for Learning

http://www.newhorizons.org

 

Partnership for 21st Century Skills

http://www.21stcenturyskills.org

 

T.H.E. Journal

http://www.thejournal.com/

 

 

Other Required and Recommended Readings and Resources

 

There will be other readings marked in the syllabus as required readings.

There will also be a number of recommended books, articles and web sites introduced during class.

 

KEY CONTENT ITEMS AND PRINCIPLES

 

THEORY & PRACTICE OF USING DIGITAL MEDIA IN THE CLASSROOM

 

I. Digital media resources and support materials for teachers

a. History and types of resources

b. Overview of current sources

 

II. Student centered approaches to using digital media in the classroom

a. Constructivist Learning Theory

b. Inquiry Learning Activities

c. Project Based Learning

 

III. Media literacy in the classroom

a. Introduction to media literacy

b. Developing skills in critically analyzing media messages

c. Key questions and resources

 

IV. Design and planning

a. Team roles

b. Planning the project’s rationale, goals and objectives

c. Storyboarding

 

V. Learning theory

a. Multimedia information and learning

b. Multiple Intelligences, revisited

c. Accessibility and Universal Design

 

VI. Assessment of student digital media projects

a. Alternative assessments and rubrics, review

b. Digital media portfolios for students

c. Digital media portfolios for teachers

 

VII. Integrating digital media experiences with content and technology standards

a. Basic integration strategies

b. Challenges

c. Local and national opportunities

 

 

DIGITAL MEDIA TOOLS AND SKILLS

 

I. Digital media basics

a. Overview of digital media tools and techniques

b. Why use built-in, free or low cost tools relative to equity and access

c. Repurposing, copyright and fair use

d. Finding, viewing, creating, editing and imbedding in projects

 

II. Digital Media Types

a. Text

b. Images

c. Audio

d. Video

 

III. Authoring and Publishing

a. Web authoring tools review (Free Web e.g. Mozilla, etc., MS Front Page)

b. Web authoring skills, links for linear, branching and menus

a. Publishing to R/W CD & DVD

b. Publishing to drop box (WinZip)

c. Publishing to web (FTP)

 

 

ASSESSMENT AND COURSE POLICIES

 

Assessment of student work will be evident throughout the class but detailed assignment criteria for major assignments will be provided in class. All in class assignments will be evaluated on their completeness, amount of positive participation, and involvement.  All written work will be evaluated on the quality of thought, completeness, adherence to guidelines, word processing style, and ability to effectively communicate ideas and information. 

All other projects will be evaluated on the appropriate use of technology, originality and practicality for use in

the classroom, as well as adherence to guidelines

 

Assignment Evaluation Criteria

Graduate work must be above average, earn an A or B grade, to be acceptable for receiving credit. 

The characteristics of graduate work are outlined below.  For all assignments, work must meet assignment specifications.  This constitutes the necessary conditions for acceptable work (regardless of quantity). 

 

Participation and In-Class Activities (20% of final grade – 20 points)

 

Active participation is a vital element for success in this course. It includes active, constructive contributions to all in-class discussions and activities. You should read all required and some recommended readings and actively contribute to discussions. Patience, perseverance, active problem-solving and mutual support, especially in cases of unexpected technical problems or set-backs is a sign of quality participation in a Learning Studio environment.

 

Assignments (40% of final grade – 40 points)

 

The following is the specific break down of points for participation in the four individual assignments:

 

Media Safari (10 Points)

Write a short essay describing the results of your process of creating a personal digital media collection with a minimum of 10 resources with notes on any accompanying lesson plans and resources. Also include one in-depth evaluation and brief lesson plan for one selected resource appropriate to your own classroom curriculum.

 

Potluck Studio (10 Points)

Write a short essay describing what resources you contributed to the in-class production studio and what personal technical challenges you addressed during the course. It should include a report of your efforts to locate equipment and facilities to do media production at your home or school.

 

Learning Theory Reflection (10 Points)

Write a short essay in which you explain how learning theory can be applied to practical classroom situations to increase quality and purpose of student learning. Begin from a personal perspective--consider how your own learning styles and Intelligences have influenced your educational successes or frustrations. Reflect upon conclusions you have drawn for yourself and how you have seen evidence of these truths in your students. Then find evidence to support your conclusions from at least three published sources and refer to these in your paper.

 

Media Literacy Reflection (10 Points)

Write a short essay summarizing your understanding of Media Literacy and it’s personal relevance to you and your life. Then describe how you feel media literacy and production relate to your own classroom curriculum. Integrate readings into your summary.

 


Course Project (40% of final grade – 40 points)

 

This course project will require you to use the knowledge you have gained to create something useful for your classroom. For your course project, you will create a mini-unit containing 3 or more lessons that you will teach in your classroom.  The mini-unit must be grounded in your classroom curriculum and require students to create a product.

 

During this course you are learning a variety of ways to use digital media in educational contexts.  Of the possible uses, the most powerful are those in which students are actively engaged in creating their own media.   For your course project, you will create a mini-unit containing 3 or more lessons that you will teach in your classroom.   It must be grounded in your classroom curriculum and must clearly engage your students in using digital media for the acquisition, analysis, construction, and presentation of knowledge.

 

Part 1, Project Proposal, Sunday First Weekend (5 %, 5 Points)

 

Create a short preliminary 1-2 page description of your mini-unit by answering the following questions:

 

a. What is your chosen subject area, theme or topic?

b. Who is your intended audience?

c. How does this project fit within your curriculum?  What standards will you address?

d. What is the educational rationale for the project?

e. What are the educational goal(s) and objective(s)?

f. What is the specific problem or question you will pose?

g. What will be the specific assignment the students must accomplish?

h. What is the expected outcome of the lesson?

i. What will be the evaluation criteria?  How will it be assessed and by whom?

 

Part 2, Exemplar Video, Friday Second Weekend (15 % of Final Grade, 15 Points)

Using the skills and tools learned in this weekend, create a preliminary exemplar of what you would like students to produce based on your lesson. You should first create the storyboard and then generate the digital media product.

Storyboard: Produce a description of the content of each page/card/screen/slide. You may use Inspiration, Word, Photoshop Elements or any application which allows you to include graphics and text.  Include the following:

 

a. Title

b. Type (Title, Index/ToC, Body)

c. Draft text. If narration, draft script.

e. Indication of type and/or description of media and approximate placement. At a minimum, include the following:

·  1 personally acquired image per card/slide (scanned, captured, internet or other archive).

·  1 personally acquired sound (narration, music clip, internet or other archive).

·  1 personally acquired video (from camera, internet or other archive).

    Please include any original pre-modified files (graphic, audio, video) with an explanation of modifications made.

f. Credits which also must include non-published contributions - ie things you own, were given or have made.

g. Bibliography/References (to cite sources of published works).

 

Product: Create and edit your exemplar digital media project.

 

Presentation: You must share your draft of your project with the class Friday night of the second weekend.

 


Part 3, Revision and Report, Due Three Weeks After 2nd Weekend (20% of final grade – 20 points)

 

For the completion of your course project, you will revise and finish your mini-unit and create supporting documentation.

 

Your project should be bound together and presented as a complete unit and must include a cover sheet, contents sheet, separate sections for each of the following components:

 

a. Rationale (1 Page)

 

Briefly describe what you did for the project and why.

 

b. Revised Description

 

Based on feedback received in class during your presentation, prepare a revised narrative describing your project.

 

c. Mini-unit with Lessons (see provided format)

 

Create your mini-unit with three or more lessons. Include any handouts, overheads or other materials you create.

 

d. Evaluation Rubric(s)

 

Create a rubric which will be used to evaluate products created by the students as a result of your lesson.

 

e. Revised Storyboard

 

Based on feedback on your presentation, prepare a revised storyboard describing your exemplar.

 

f. Revised Exemplar

 

Based on feedback on your presentation, prepare a revised exemplar video (if necessary).

 

Apply the rubric to your own exemplar.

 

g. Teacher Notes

 

Create a supplement for the teacher. It may include but is not limited to materials, textbooks, periodicals, Internet sites, hardware/software needed, management, integration for teacher, time for lesson implementation, grade level, standards addressed by lesson, cautions, options, extensions

 

h. Reflection (3 Pages)

 

Reflect upon the process of creating the project and what you learned. Address the following:

 

a. What did you take into consideration from the course readings?

b. What obstacles did you encounter and what solutions did you use to resolve those issues?

c. How could you make the presentation better with more time, skill or resources?

 

i. Bibliography

 

 

You may turn it in using the following methods:

 

Save presentation to thumb drive (it can be returned to you upon request)

Burn presentation on CD (be sure to include all audio/video files)


Official Format for Student Work

The Lesley University School of Education has adopted the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th Edition [2001] as the official format for student papers, citations and bibliographies, effective September 2001. Students are encouraged to obtain a personal copy of the APA's 5th Edition for the first course in their program of study. The Ludcke Library APA page also provides helpful information on APA guidelines.

 

Academic Integrity

One of the responsibilities of the Lesley community is to uphold the integrity of our academic programs.  In order to do this, we must refuse to allow plagiarism or cheating.  This responsibility belongs to all members of the community – to faculty and students alike.  Some of the student responsibilities are paraphrased from the University policy below. 

 

As students, it is your responsibility first to learn proper citation of sources.  The American Psychological Association Handbook defines plagiarism and give complete descriptions.  You should report observed cases of cheating or plagiarism to the faculty member who teaches the course in which the incident took place.  To protect yourself, you should keep any incremental work on each submitted paper until the paper has been graded and returned (e.g,. notes, rough drafts, and a copy of each paper you submit for course credit).  Finally, you must submit original work for each assignment, both within and between courses.  You may not submit one piece of work to more than one course. If you wish special consideration to share projects between courses, you must request and receive written permission from the instructors of the courses involved.

 

These are but a few of the student responsibilities.  I strongly advise all students to obtain and become familiar with a complete description of University policies and procedures on academic integrity, which includes definitions of plagiarism and cheating.  Violations of these policies hold severe academic consequences, including but not limited to course failure or dismissal from the University.  Academic Integrity policies and procedures are available online: http://www.lesley.edu/policies/catalog/integrity.html.

 

Attendance

This graduate level course, for three credits, requires 45 in-class hours of attendance. Attendance for all sessions is mandatory, except for "milestone" or emergency circumstances. For this class, "milestone" circumstances are those generally defined as "rare" important events such as weddings, funerals etc. Recreational events such as vacations and ballgames etc. do not qualify. Emergencies are, by definition, unforeseeable. However, key terms to keep in mind are "serious" and "unavoidable".  Serious emergency and significant "milestone" circumstances may warrant exception and will be considered on a case-by-case basis in consultation with your Academic Advisor (listed on your schedule) and the Program Director. If you will miss class for any reason, then you are responsible for contacting me to discuss the nature of the emergency and "milestone" circumstance, whether the course attendance expectations will permit make-up work and/or whether there may be an adverse effect on your final grade.  If you miss more than the equivalent of one full day over the two weekends, it will result in a grade of technical fail (TF) on your transcript. You will need to take the class, and pay tuition again.

 

Incomplete Grades (Highly Discouraged!)

Students who find it impossible to complete course requirements by the due date may request a grade of "incomplete". To do this you must notify your instructor, in writing, prior to the end of the class and explain your need for a grade of incomplete. Incomplete grades must be taken care of no later than the end of the semester immediately following the current semester. After this, the incomplete grade becomes a permanent grade of “F”  that will remain on the student’s transcript, and the course must be repeated by the student-quite possibly traveling to another site.

 

Class Cancellation and Make-up Policy

In the event of severely inclement weather, students will be notified by the site coordinator and the times when the class will be rescheduled to fulfill the required hours. In the event of an extreme personal emergency, individual students must confer with the instructor to arrange for fulfilling the required hours.

 

Special Needs

Lesley University is committed to ensuring the full participation of all students in its programs. Accordingly, if a student has a documented disability, and, as a result, needs some accommodation to complete course requirements, he/she should inform the instructor at the beginning of the course. For further information about services through Lesley University for students with disabilities, please contact Manju Banerjee, Coordinator of Disability Services, at (617) 349-8194 or (617) 349-8530 (message), or e-mail: banerjee@mail.lesley.edu

 

Further Information

More information about Lesley University policies can be found here on the web:

http://www.lesley.edu/policies.html

 

BRIEF COURSE SCHEDULE, CONTENT AND ACTIVITIES

 

WEEKEND 1

FRIDAY, PM

 

1. INTRODUCTIONS & COURSE OVERVIEW

a. Introductions

b. Overview of uses of digital media in the classroom.

c. Course syllabus, readings and resources

 

2. THEORY & PRACTICE – RESOURCES

a. History and types of resources

b. Overview of current sources

 

Assignment — Media Safari

 

3. TOOLS & SKILLS – STUDIO SET-UP

a. Overview of digital media tools and techniques

b. Why use built-in, free or low cost tools relative to equity and access

c. Repurposing, copyright and fair use

 

Assignment — Potluck Studio

 

SATURDAY, AM

 

4. THEORY & PRACTICE – STUDENT CENTERED APPROACHES

a. Constructivist Learning Theory

b. Inquiry Learning Activities

c. Project Based Learning

 

Activity – Student Produced Video, Search & Share Mission

 

5. THEORY & PRACTICE – COURSE PROJECT ASSIGNMENT

 

SATURDAY, PM

 

6. THEORY & PRACTICE – MEDIA LITERACY, PART 1

a. Introduction to media literacy

b. Developing skills in critically analyzing media messages

c. Key questions

 

Activity — Magazines, the good, the bad and the ugly

 

7. TOOLS & SKILLS – TEXT AND IMAGES

a. Finding and viewing

b. Editing and saving

c. Creating your own pictures

d. Scanning originals

 

Activity — Text and Images Lab

 


SUNDAY, AM

 

8. THEORY & PRACTICE – DESIGN AND PLANNING

a. Team roles

b. Planning the project’s rationale, goals and objectives

c. Storyboarding

 

Activity — Analyze Sample Course Project

 

9. THEORY & PRACTICE – LEARNING THEORY

a. Multimedia information and learning

b. Multiple Intelligences, revisited

c. Accessibility and Universal Design

 

Assignment – Learning Theory Brief Reflection

 

SUNDAY, PM

 

10. TOOLS & SKILLS – WEB AUTHORING WORKSHOP

a. Web authoring tools review  (Free Web e.g. Mozilla, etc., MS Front Page)

b. Web authoring skills, links for linear, branching and menus

 

Activity — Web Skills Lab

 

11. TOOLS & SKILLS – AUDIO & VIDEO BASICS

 

a. Finding & Playing

b. Recording Audio & Video

c. Built-in Editing Tools

 

Activity — Media Montage

 


WEEKEND 2

FRIDAY, PM

 

12. COURSE PROJECTSHARING

 

13. THEORY & PRACTICE – MEDIA LITERACY, PART 2

 

Activity — Reel to Real?

 

Assignment – Media Literacy Brief Reflection

 

14. TOOLS & SKILLS – FUTURE MEDIA

a. Media convergence

b. Issues of the moment

 

SATURDAY, AM

 

15. THEORY & PRACTICE – ASSESSMENT

a. Alternative assessments and rubrics, review

b. Digital media portfolios for students

c. Digital media portfolios for teachers

 

16. THEORY & PRACTICE – INTEGRATION, PART 2

a. Challenges

b. Where to from here?

 

In-Class Discussion, Local, Regional & National Opportunities

 

SATURDAY, PM

 

17. TOOLS & SKILLS – VIDEO PRODUCTION

a. Video sources and resources, repurposing revisited

b. Capturing video clips, revisited

c. Video editing, integrating media in a digital video stream

 

Activity — Video Commercial

 

SUNDAY, AM

 

18. COMMERCIAL, SHOOTING & PRODUCTION

 

SUNDAY, PM

 

19. TOOLS & SKILLS – PUBLISHING

a. Publishing to R/W CD & DVD

b. Publishing to drop box (WinZip)

c. Publishing to web (FTP)

 

 

20. COMMERCIAL PRIMERE!

 

21. COURSE EVALUATION

 

 

 


EXTENDED BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

George Lucas Foundation (2005).  Project Based Learning, An Integral Approach: CSI Module. The World of Learning: Eductopia. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.edutopia.org/modules/PBL/index.php

 

George Lucas Foundation (2005).  Technology Integration: Language Arts & Social Studies Module. The World of Learning: Eductopia. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.edutopia.org/modules/LASS/index.php

 

George Lucas Foundation (2005).  Technology Integration: Math & Science Module. The World of Learning: Eductopia. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.edutopia.org/modules/ms/index.php

 

George Lucas Foundation (2005).  Theory of Multiple Intelligences Module. The World of Learning: Eductopia. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.edutopia.org/modules/mi/index.php

 

Graham, D. and Mason, D. (2000, January). Multimedia applications on a shoestring budget [Online]. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from  http://www.techlearning.com/db_area/archives/WCE/archives/donnas.htm

 

Hobbs, R.(2003).  Changing what, why, and how you watch: Nine critical questions to help you know TV. Media Literacy Clearninghouse. Retrieved from: http://medialit.med.sc.edu/knowtv.htm

 

Lehman, B.A. (1998, November). Specific The Conference on Fair Use: final report to the commissioner on the conclusion of the Conference on Fair Use. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from  http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/dcom/olia/confu/index.html

 

Limpus, B. (1994). Lights, Camera, Action! A Guide to Using Video Production and Instruction in the Classroom. Prufrock Press. 

 

Martin, G.P. & Burnette, C. (2000, October).  Maximizing multiple intelligence through multimedia: A real application of gardner’s theories. MultiMedia Schools 7(5). Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.infotoday.com/MMSchools/oct00/martin&burnette.htm

 

Najjar, L. J. (1996). Multimedia information and learning. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 5(2), 129-150.

 

November, A. (2001). Empowering students with technology. Glenview, IL: Skylight Professional Development.

 

Richardson, K.W. (2002, January). Copyright in the classroom: A workshop for educators. Technology & Learning. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.techlearning.com/db_area/archives/WCE/archives/kwrich.htm

 

Soos, R. (2001, August). Multimedia projects: An effective use of technology as a tool in elementary education. Technology & Learning. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.techlearning.com/db_area/archives/WCE/archives/soos.htm

 

Szul, L. F., & Woodland, D. E. (1998, February). Does the right software a great designer make? T.H.E. Journal, 25(7). 48-49 [On-line]. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from  http://www.thejournal.com/magazine/vault/A2012.cfm

 

Thoman, E. (2003). Skills & strategies for media education. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from 

http://www.medialit.org/reading_room/pdf/CMLskillsandstrat.pdf

 

Thornburg, D. (2002, February). Images first, text second. PBS TeacherLine: Consider This.  Retrieved February 18, 2005, from  http://teacherline.pbs.org/teacherline/resources/thornburg/thornburg0202.cfm

 

Thibodeau, P. (1997, February). Design standards for visual elements and interactivity for courseware. T.H.E. Journal, 24(7), 84-85 [On-line]. Retrieved February 18, 2005, from http://www.thejournal.com/magazine/vault/A1536.cfm

 

 

 

ISTE NETS-T Alignment Key (See Red Indicators Above)

 

I           TECHNOLOGY OPERATIONS AND CONCEPTS.

            Teachers demonstrate a sound understanding of technology operations and concepts. Teachers:

I-A        demonstrate introductory knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts related to technology (as described in the ISTE National Education Technology Standards for Students)

I-B        demonstrate continual growth in technology knowledge and skills to stay abreast of current and emerging technologies.

 

II          PLANNING AND DESIGNING LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS AND EXPERIENCES.

            Teachers plan and design effective learning environments and experiences supported by technology. Teachers:            

II-A       design developmentally appropriate learning opportunities that apply technology-enhanced instructional strategies to support the diverse needs of learners.

II-B       apply current research on teaching and learning with technology when planning learning environments and experiences.

II-C       identify and locate technology resources and evaluate them for accuracy and suitability.

II-D       plan for the management of technology resources within the context of learning activities.

II-E       plan strategies to manage student learning in a technology-enhanced environment.

 

III         TEACHING, LEARNING, AND THE CURRICULUM.

            Teachers implement curriculum plans, that include methods and strategies for applying technology to maximize student learning. Teachers:

III-A      facilitate technology-enhanced experiences that address content standards and student technology standards.

III-B      use technology to support learner-centered strategies that address the diverse needs of students.

III-C      apply technology to develop students' higher order skills and creativity.

III-D      manage student learning activities in a technology-enhanced environment.

 

IV         ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION.

            Teachers apply technology to facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies. Teachers:           

IV-A     apply technology in assessing student learning of subject matter using a variety of assessment techniques.

IV-B     use technology resources to collect and analyze data, interpret results, and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and maximize student learning.

IV-C     apply multiple methods of evaluation to determine students' appropriate use of technology resources for learning, communication,and productivity.

 

V          PRODUCTIVITY AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE.

            Teachers use technology to enhance their productivity and professional practice. Teachers:  

V-A      use technology resources to engage in ongoing professional development and lifelong learning.

V-B      continually evaluate and reflect on professional practice to make informed decisions regarding the use of technology in support of student learning.

V-C      apply technology to increase productivity.

V-D      use technology to communicate and collaborate with peers, parents, and the larger community in order to nurture student learning.

 

VI         SOCIAL, ETHICAL, LEGAL, AND HUMAN ISSUES.

            Teachers understand the social,ethical,legal,and human issues surrounding the use of technology in PK-12 schools and apply those principles in practice. Teachers:         

VI-A     model and teach legal and ethical practice related to technology use.

VI-B     apply technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities.

VI-C     identify and use technology resources that affirm diversity

VI-D     promote safe and healthy use of technology resources.

VI-E     facilitate equitable access to technology resources for all students.



* The goals in this syllabus are followed references to the ISTE Educational Technology Standards

   and Performance Indicators for Teachers, with reference numbers.   Example: (ISTE-T I. A.) 

   Please refer to the ISTE NETS-T Alignment Key on the last page for a full list of the standards.

 

MULTIMEDIA WEB LINKS - see
barry.haines.net/templates.html

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Here is a listing of some other resource books that you may wish to purchase for this course.  You may also find resources at the web site:

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY found at:

barry.haines.net/OnlineArticles.htm